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Rim Rifaat Al Safadi

Assistant professor
Life & Earth Sciences department - Section III - Tripoli
Speciality: Biology
Specific Speciality: Santé, Sciences Technologies

Positions
2012 - 2015 :

Faculty of Sciences
TRIPOLI

Teaching 11 Taught Courses
(2014-2015) Biol 100 - Cellular Biology and General Histology (animal and plant)

BS Earth and life sciences

(2014-2015) DMAH 522 - Applied human genomics

M2 Human Molecular Diagnostics

(2014-2015) BIOA 421 - Project

M1 Cellular and Molecular Biology - Section 3

(2014-2015) BIOA 421 - Project

M1 Cellular and Molecular Biology - Section 3

(2014-2015) BIOA 464 - Advanced Microbiology

M1 Cellular and Molecular Biology - Section 3

(2014-2015) BIOA 465 - Advanced Microbiology Lab

M1 Cellular and Molecular Biology - Section 3

(2014-2015) Biol 321 - Molecular Genetics

BS Earth and life sciences

(2014-2015) Biol 341 - Molecular Genetics Lab

BS Earth and life sciences

(2014-2015) Biol 341 - Molecular Genetics Lab

BS Earth and life sciences

(2014-2015) Biol 327 - Molecular Biology

BS Earth and life sciences

(2014-2015) Biol 347 - Molecular Biology Lab

BS Earth and life sciences

Education
Supervision 2 Supervised Students
Food Microbiology-Balamand University

Diana Eter
Isolation and identification of microbes associated with fresh and frozen meat and examination of biofilm forming ability of identified bacterial strains

The microbiota and the bacterial load of Lebanese fresh and imported chilled meats were investigated in this study. Imported meat demonstrated higher bacterial load than local meat in terms of mesophilic and psychotrophic bacteria. In addition, when compared to LIBNOR Standards, Lebanese meat was safe to consume while imported meat was unfit to human consumption since total mesophilic count results were exceeding the acceptable microbiological limit. This high bacteria load could be attributed to bad sanitary conditions under which imported meat were handled and kept. Almost all bacteria isolated from local and imported meats were opportunistic human pathogens and some were found common in both types of meat while others were specific for each sample. In addition, the biofilm forming abilities of isolated bacteria were evaluated under conditions mimicking the food contact surfaces and gastrointestinal tract environments. Isolated bacterial species were found to vary widely in their ability to form a biofilm. These variations could be due to differences in the genome or in the genes expression of these bacteria

Food Microbiology-Balamand University

Ranime Nafeh
Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Detection of Phages in Dairy Products

The diversity of Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in raw milk and cheese sample was investigated in this study. Two samples of raw milk and halloumy cheese were studied. LAB isolated from these two samples were identified. Five species were found in milk samples that includes Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactococcus Lactic, Streptococcus thermophillus, Lactobacillus paracasei and Leuconostcmesenteroidescreomris.Six species were detected in halloumy cheese that includes: Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus pentosus, andLeuconostocmesenteroidescremoris.Milk sampleswere then analyzed for the presenceof bacteriophages and no bacteriophage was found.Moreover, the bacterial strains identified in this study were investigated for the presence of temperate phages by induction with mitomycinC.Only Lactococcus lactis isolated from milk samples was found to carry bacteriophages in its genome. Lysogenic lactic acid bacteria may lead to fermentation failure and thus represent a high risk for the dairy industry.